~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ FEELING GREAT!
Helping You To Live An Inspired Life
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IN THIS ISSUE:

1. Announcements - FR*EE Gift For You!
2. Article: Why Marriage Matters
3. Inspiring Quote
4. Professional Services
5. Pass It Along

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ANNOUNCEMENTS - Fr*ee Inspirational Quotes Book

Don't forget to download your fr*ee book to keep you inspired over the next year!

The link is below:

The Inspirational Quotes Book

CHILD PROBLEMS?

Give us a call. Monica DuBina is our new Play Therapist. I sat in a session with her yesterday. Wow. She's magical with children, but I also observed her connecting with a very challenging father. The father went from resistance to agreeing that weekly sessions would really help his son.

Need to gain a new perspective regarding a child issue? Stuck in your own efforts? Call us and invite Monica to help. She will help you as soon as you step forward to make that call.

She can be reached at 317-865-1674 USA

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WHY MARRIAGE MATTERS

Marriage is one of my top specialties. I always loom over the latest research. Prepare yourselves, here comes a powerhouse of information on the vital importance of creating, maintaining or rebuilding your marriage.

Twenty-Six Conclusions from the Social Science Experts

Sixteen of the top scholars on family life have re-issued a joint report on the importance of marriage. First released in 2002, the newly revised edition highlights five new themes in marriage-related research.

Why Marriage Matters, Second Edition: 26 Conclusions from the Social Sciences was produced by a politically diverse and interdisciplinary group of leading family scholars, chaired by W. Bradford Wilcox of the University of Virginia and includes psychologist John Gottman, best selling author of books about marriage and relationships, Linda Waite, coauthor of The Case for Marriage, Norval Glenn and Steven Nock, two of the top family social scientists in the country, William Galston, a Clinton Administration domestic policy advisor, and Judith Wallerstein, author of the national bestseller The Unexpected Legacy of Divorce.

Since 1960, the proportion of children who do not live with their own two parents has risen sharply—from 19.4% to 42.3% in the Nineties. This change has been caused, first, by large increases in divorce, and more recently, by a big jump in single mothers and cohabiting couples who have children but don't marry. For several decades the impact of this dramatic change in family structure has been the subject of vigorous debate among scholars. No longer. These 26 findings are now widely agreed upon.

Five New Themes

In addition to reviewing research on family topics covered in the first edition of the report, Why Marriage Matters, Second Edition highlights five new themes in marriage-related research.

  1. Even though marriage has lost ground in the minority communities in recent years, marriage has not lost its value in these communities.
  2. An emerging line of research indicates that marriage benefits poor Americans, and Americans from disadvantaged backgrounds, even though these Americans are now less likely to get and stay married.
  3. Marriage seems to be particularly important in civilizing men, turning their attention away from dangerous, antisocial, or self-centered activities and towards the needs of a family.
  4. Beyond its well-known contributions to adult health, marriage influences the biological functioning of adults and children in ways that can have important social consequences.
  5. The relationship quality of intimate partners is related to both their marital status and, for married adults, to the degree to which these partners are committed to marriage.

Update Research Findings

Among the research findings summarized by the report are:

About Children

  • Parental divorce reduces the likelihood that children will graduate from college, and achieve high-status jobs.
  • Children who live with their own two married parents enjoy better physical health, on average, than children in other family forms. The health advantages of married homes remain even after taking into account socioeconomic status.
  • Parental divorce approximately doubles the odds that adult children will end up divorced.

About Men

  • Married men earn between 10 and 40 percent more than single men with similar education and job histories.
  • Married people, especially married men, have longer life expectancies than otherwise similar singles.
  • Marriage increases the likelihood fathers will have good relationships with children. Sixty-five percent of young adults whose parents divorced had poor relationships with their fathers (compared to 29% from non-divorced families).
About Women

  • Divorce and unmarried childbearing significantly increases poverty rates of both mothers and children. Between one-fifth and one-third of divorcing women end up in poverty as a result of divorce.
  • Married mothers have lower rates of depression than single or cohabiting mothers.
  • Married women appear to have a lower risk of domestic violence than cohabiting or dating women. Even after controlling for race, age, and education, people who live together are still three times more likely to report violent arguments than married people.
About Society

  • Adults who live together but do not marry—cohabitors—are more similar to singles than to married couples in terms of physical health and disability, emotional well-being and mental health, as well as assets and earnings. Their children more closely resemble the children of single people than the children of married people.
  • Marriage appears to reduce the risk that children and adults will be either perpetrators or victims of crime. Single and divorced women are four to five times more likely to be victims of violent crime in any given year than married women. Boys raised in single-parent homes are about twice as likely (and boys raised in stepfamilies three times as likely) to have committed a crime that leads to incarceration by the time they reach their early thirties, even after controlling for factors such as race, mother's education, neighborhood quality and cognitive ability.
Conclusions

The authors conclude with three fundamental conclusions:

  1. Marriage is an important social good, associated with an impressively broad array of positive outcomes for children and adults alike.
  2. Marriage is an important public good, associated with a range of economic, health, educational, and safety benefits that help local, state, and federal governments serve the common good.
  3. The benefits of marriage extend to poor and minority communities, despite the fact that marriage is particularly fragile in these communities.
You can order your copy of this report for a modest $5

To place your order by telephone, contact:

Institute for American Values
Phone:212.246.3942 USA

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THOUGHT FOR THE DAY

Early last year my wife and I were leading a marriage workshop. I quoted Frank Pittman saying, "Marriage is the institution which holds us together as we fall in and out of love." A gentleman in the audience shouts out, "Yeah, it's an institution all right!"

You gotta love the sense of humor that can keep a marriage buoyant even in the toughest times.

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

1) Phone Therapy
2) Life Coaching
3) Email Consultations

Myself or someone on my staff is always available to speak with you about our full range of services. In fact, we can recommend exactly the right service to you based on your needs. Coaching ALWAYS starts with a no-cost, complimentary session. And, our therapy services are guaranteed! No other company in my business that I know offers this. Give us a call for more information at 317-865-1674 USA.

or visit our website:

CounselingPros

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PASS IT ALONG

You know at least one person who is hungry for this particular article. Take a moment and pass it along - "Pay it Forward"

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Written by Dave Turo-Shields, ACSW, LCSW, CEC
President, CounselingPros.com, Kenosis Counseling, Inc.
622 W. Valley View Drive
Indianapolis, Indiana USA 46217
317-865-1674
(c) Copyright 2005 CounselingPros.com, Inc.
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